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Overview of the "again revised" Dalhousie Corridor

Where is it?
Click image to enlarge
 
 
 

Overview of the "revised" Dalhousie Corridor

What is it? The "revised" Dalhousie Corridor (unveiled August 12, 2010) is a proposed exclusive bus corridor connecting the Bonaventure Expressway with the Downtown Terminus (TCV) principally using Dalhousie St. in Griffintown. Unlike the "original" corridor, the revised version uses Dalhousie in the northbound direction only, and a proportion of empty buses are diverted to Peel St. All buses use a reserved lane on Nazareth St. in the southbound direction.
 
 
Where is it?
Click image to enlarge
 
 
How much? Estimated cost $60 million
 
 
Why? To improve the public transit offering on the Bonaventure axis pending the completion of a light-rail system (LRS) connecting downtown Montréal and the South-Shore. To reduce transit times in the northbound direction (the southbound route is virtually unchanged from its pre-Quartier-Bonaventure configuration).
 
 
When? Work is scheduled to start in Spring 2011 and be completed by 2014. Work on Quartier Bonaventure had already begun as of the announcement of the "revised" corridor.
 
 
 

Overview of the "original" Dalhousie Corridor

What is it? The Dalhousie Corridor is a proposed exclusive bus corridor connecting the Bonaventure Expressway with the Downtown Terminus (TCV) principally using Dalhousie St. in Griffintown. The Corridor is part of the proposed Quartier Bonaventure.
 
 
Where is it?
Click image to enlarge, or click here to see the Corridor in a Google Street View montage
 
 
How much? Estimated cost $86 million (Summer 2009)
Estimated cost $119 million by AMT after security audit (Page 111)
 
Why? To provide a more efficient route for South Shore and Nun's Island buses between the Lachine Canal and the TCV. Currently, these buses use a reserved lane on Duke St. and shared city streets. They transport approximately 42,000 commuters per day.
 
 
Who's in charge? The Société du Havre de Montréal (SHM) is responsible for the proposed Dalhousie Corridor. You can obtain the full report (French only) or report synthesis concerning the Corridor and Quartier Bonaventure on their website.
 
 
When? After public consultations, the Dalhousie Corridor is heavily criticized in the OCPM report of March 2010. This prompted Richard Bergeron of the Montréal executive committee to state "The Dalhousie Corridor, as it has been proposed to date, can safely be considered dead". Nonetheless, the SHM continue to suggest that variants of the same corridor remain viable. We invite you to explore this website to refine your own opinion and then to express it to the organisations and inviduals responsible for its adoption.